Thomas and Eleanor (Henry’s great grandparents)

Thomas and Eleanor were Henry’s great grandparents. The 1841 one census shows Thomas aged 55 and Eleanor aged 36, living with their children Anne, Eleanor, Frank, Edward, Elizabeth and Mary in Stockton. On the 1851 census Eleanor, aged 46, can be found living at High Street, Stockton, Durham, England with daughters Elizabeth, Mary, Emma and Caroline. She is described as a widow and her occupation is given as Annuitant. In 1871 Eleanor is recorded as a widow aged 66, still living in Stockton with her daughters Mary Grey Faber and Caroline Grey Faber. On the 1881 census, Eleanor can again be found, now living only with her daughter Caroline.

The ages I have gathered from searches of census returns I have undertaken, do do correspond with the information from the Hamilton Stanley Faber papers, so this page is a work in progress.

Images of Thomas and Eleanor Faber.
Family tree showing Eleanor Grey married to Thomas henry Faber.

Henry Grey Faber (Henry’s grandfather)

Henry’s grandfather was also called  Henry Grey Faber. Henry was the first son of Thomas Henry and Eleanor Faber, born 30 November 1829 and baptised on 1 December 1829.

Henry can be found on the 1841 census, aged 11, at Shincliffe, St Oswald, Durham and Lanchester, Durham, England which appears to be a school. In 1851 aged 21 Henry can be found lodging in the household of George and Hannah Harrision at Church Street, Guisborough, Yorkshire & Yorkshire (North Riding), England and employed as a Solicitor’s Articled Clerk.  In 1871 he can be found aged 41 residing with the Moore family.

Further information can be found in the papers of Hamilton Stanley Faber in which the family are referred to as ‘Branch 1 – The Stockton (Eeles) branch of the Grey Fabers’ and in which Eleanor is recorded as the daughter of John Grey Esq of Norton.

Thomas Faber (Henry’s father)

Henry’s father was Thomas H Faber, born 1861. Thomas can be found on the 1871 census at Middleton One Row, Middleton St George, Darlington, Durham, England, aged 10, with his parents Henry Grey Faber, aged 41 (born 1830 in Durham) and Elizabeth Faber, aged 38 (born 1833 in Durham). Also four brothers and two sisters – Eleanor J Faber, Elizabeth S Faber, Frank S Faber, Charles E Faber, Frederic William Faber and John G Faber. The Faber family are recorded as visitors to Sarah Moore aged 75 and her daughter Mary A Moore aged 37.

On the 1891 census, Thomas, aged 30, is recorded as living with his wife Ada C Faber and his sons Henry G Faber and Frank S Faber. Thomas is recorded as a solicitor. On the 1901 census, Thomas and Ada can again be found.  They have five daughters named Ada, Helen, Lorna, Culeen and Olive. And in 1911 the family can be found at 100 High Street, Norton On Tees. Henry Grey Faber, aged 24, is again living with them and father and son are both recorded as solicitors.

This information is also corroborated in the Hamilton Stanley Faber papers, which displays a family tree in which the family are referred to as Branch 1 – The Stockton (Eeles) branch of the Grey Fabers.)

Family tree showing the Stockton (Eeles) branch of the grey Fabers.
Family tree showing the Stockton (Eeles) branch of the grey Fabers.

Squaddie graffiti

I stumbled across this story when researching Henry Grey Faber.  An article in the Yorkshire Evening post dated 29 June 1950 reports on regimental badges in the Sudan, in the hills near Atbara. The article states these badges reminded the writer of the Kilburn white horse and displays an image of the West Yorkshire Regiment badge on a hillside in the Sudan.

The article explains how the badges are made and goes on to quote Henry Faber of Leeds who spent nine months in the Sudan with the Green Howards as saying ‘the patch of hillside is first cleared and then the badge is carefully mapped out. The rocks are manhandled by the troops and gradually the badge takes shape. Most of the Green Howards’ badge was built on free afternoons and it was mighty hot work.’ I do not believe the Henry Faber quoted in the article is the one I have researched on this website but the story fascinated me, so I wanted to include it here.

Yorkshire Evening Post: 29 June 1950

David Love

Further investigation found a blog post on the Love Adventures website by David Love, a British adventurer, mountaineer and expedition leader.  In the post, David describes going in search of a British Army Memorial, built by the last serving unit in Sudan before the country gained independence in 1956.

Turning to satellite imagery to study the area around Gebeit did not reveal any possible locations of the lost memorial but did find some very odd looking images on a nearby rocky hillside, blurry effigies which seemed to resemble old military insignia.  If David wanted to find the memorial, he would need to go to Gebeit.

Leaving Khartoum and heading north along the River Nile, David reached the rocky foothills at the edge of the remote village of Gebeit in Northern Sudan, at the fringes of the Sahara desert, where he had previously identified the blurry effigies on satellite imagery and saw, towering some 200ft above him what he describes as 130 year old Squaddie graffiti but on a totally epic scale.

David writes ‘As I edged backwards to take in more of the landscape, I began to make out even more of what was instantly recognisable as military insignia.  In total there were 18 massive images covering an area roughly two kilometres in length across the face of the hillsides. On closer inspection, the incredibly detailed images were made from piles of different coloured rocks from the surrounding foothills.’

Memories from Sudan

Other recollections in the Yorkshire Evening post article included Mr Butterill who described how white stone from the surrounding hills was built up gradually in a pattern of a badge. The work was done after sundown and in the early  morning he recalled.

And Mr P Addison who spent 24 years in the Sudan said the badges in the hills at Gebeit are some 200 miles from Atbara, on the railway line to Port Sudan. They are not cut out of the hillside he explained but are made of white stones set close together. Most of them date  immediately to a period immediately after world war one. Gebeit is nearly 3,000 feet above sea level and in the summer has a more agreeable climate than Khartoum or Atbata. It was the custom to send all detachments of British garrison troops to camp at Gebeit to have a few weeks change from the summer heat and sandstorms of the Sudan.  It became the fashion for these detached units to occupy their leisure in constructing their regimental badges on the hillside. Each is carefully set out and contains many hundreds of stones.

Other examples of badges

The badges in the Sudan are not the only examples of regimental badges.

The Fovant Badges

The Fovant badges are a set of regimental badges on the Downs of Wiltshire at Fovant. During World War I there was a need to establish training camps for troops engaged in the battlefields of France and one of the areas chosen was at the village of Fovant.

The church of St George in the village of Fovant has rows of war graves of British and Australian soldiers and in memory of those who had died, regimental badges were carved by their comrades. Many of the original carvings failed to survive the elements and at the end of world war I there were 20 identifiable badges.

During World War II, the badges were allowed to overgrow in order that they could not be used as landmarks by enemy aircraft. Following the end of the war the local Home Guard formed themselves into an Old Comrades Association and took on the arduous task of restoration. In the years 1948 – 1951 two Wilshire badges were cut and in 1970 a Royal Signals Badge was added.

Cherat badges

Cherat, located in the Peshawar District of India, was a hill a military garrison and sanatorium for British troops stationed in the Peshawar Valley. Many of the troops sent there, carved and painted their regimental insignia on to nearby rock faces to mark their service on the frontier.

Further information and sources

Dorothy and Henry

Dorothy Faber or aunt Dorothy as I knew her was my great aunt (my grandmother’s sister on my fathers side). In 1960 she married Henry (Hal) Grey Faber. Dorothy was Henry’s second wife and the couple were married at  Holy Trinity Church, Micklegate, York in 1960.

Dorothy and Hal lived in the village of Husthwaite in Yorkshire which is situated about 17 miles north of York. Husthwaite is an ancient settlement, one of the oldest buildings being St Nicholas’ Parish Church dating from the twelfth century, which, with the village green, forms the centre of the village. The village is a designated conservation area and is adjacent to the North Yorkshire Moors National Park.

They lived in a house called Little Worsall, situated between the Methodist Chapel, a newer house and The Manor House which was once a farm.  However, until I came to write this piece I never knew the name of the property or the house number.  Letters were addressed simply to Mrs D M Faber,  Husthwaite, York.  ‘The postman knows the house’, my parents were told.

Dorothy and Hal lived at Little Worsall for six years. Henry died in 1966 before I was born but Dorothy continued to live there, with her sister Molly until 1994, then alone until her own death in 1998.

Dorothy and Molly.

Worsall Grange

The 1939 register records Henry living at Worsall Grange, Stokesley, Yorkshire (North Riding), England, working as a solicitor and living with his wife Ellen G Faber and daughter Elizabeth H F Faber. Living with them are two domestic servants, Bridget Dowd and Madelaine Nugent

Copy of the 1939 register showing Henry Faber.

Today Worsall Grange is a listed building, described in estate agent particulars as a delightful grade II listed detached country house set in 2.44 acres approx, between the villages of Low Worsall and Kirklevington, well placed for the thriving market town of Yarm and with a small paddock laid to grass that extends to 18 acres.

The Cleveland and Teeside History Society record the place name Low Worsall as ‘Modern English low + place-name Wercesal, Wirceshel, Werchesal(e) 1086 Wi- Wyrkesale 1285-1367, Wirsal (1316) 16th, 1369, Parva Worsall“Little Worsall” 1483.’

Little Worsall

It seems that when Henry moved to Husthwaite, his new home was named after Worsall Grange.  The Husthwaite History Society records the following information about Little Worsall.

In the seventeenth century the property described here had 4½ acres at the back, stretching down to Elphin Lane. Later this tract was farmed as part of the Manor House land and by 1841 some rearrangement of boundaries had taken place. The tenants of the early eighteenth century were called Wood and survival of the fieldnames Wood Garths suggests a reconstruction.  This leads to the conclusion that the frontage of the old tenement would have extended from Little Worsall to Colton House.

Several facts about this property in the early seventeenth century suggest that it was of importance in the management of the manor. It lay alongside the Hall and Hall Garths. It belonged to the family who held the lease and hence lordship of the manor. It had a dovecote (the only one known in Husthwaite), a privilege of manorial lords.

Little Worsall
Image of Little Worsall and information about the people who lived there.

Little Worsall

Dorothy

Dorothy Margaret Clarke was born in Northamptonshire in 1904. She was the daughter of Louisa Jane Shortland and  Albert Edward William Clarke,  a police sergeant in the Northamptonshire Constabulary. She had one brother named Edward Alexander and three sisters, Cecily Mary (known as Molly who lived with her at Little Worsall from 1966 – 1994), Kitty Alexandra and my grandmother Delia Eileen.

Louisa Jane Clarke (nee Shortland) and daughters.

The 1939 register shows Dorothy, working as a school teacher, living in the Morrison household at Faceby Manor, Faceby, Stokesley R.D., Yorkshire (North Riding), England. Today Faceby Manor Lodge is a Grade II listed building.

1939 register entry showing Dorothy Clarke.

It also appears that Dorothy worked as a governess. One of the most interesting things Dorothy sent to me was the letter below from a Miss Lennox-Carr of Piccadilly (according to the biography of the historical novelist Georgette Heyer, Miss Lennox-Carr ran a registry office for governesses), recommending Dorothy for the post of governess to the young King of Iraq. I don’t believe that Dorothy took up the offer but nevertheless it is a lovely piece of family history.

governess-1

governess-2
In January 2022 I was contacted by Tony Walker who had seen this blog. He had come across a document for Miss Carr’s agency when sorting through some some historical papers and asked if I would like a copy. The document can be viewed below.

Terms and conditions for Miss Lennox-Carr's Ladies' Employment and School Agency.

The things I remember about Dorothy are firstly her two dogs, Otter and Toby – sausage dogs, one smooth haired and one wired haired.  The second, the incredible view from her garden of the Kilburn white horse, one of the most famous landmarks in North Yorkshire and one of the most northerly turf-cut figures in Britain. Dating from 1857, the outline of the horse was marked out by the Kilburn village schoolmaster and his pupils. Finally, the way she encouraged my interest in my family from a young age, with letters, stories and photos. Dorothy is hugely responsible for my love of history today..

Henry in uniform.

Henry G Faber in uniform.

Hal

Henry Grey Faber was a solicitor. His occupation is recorded in census returns and I have also found mentions of Henry’s legal career in the Gazette newspaper.

The 1891 census shows a Henry  G Faber was born in Durham in 1887, to Thomas Faber, aged 30 (born 1861 in Durham) and Ada Faber  aged 29 (born 1862 in Wimbledon, Surrey). A younger brother and sister, Frank S and Ada L are recorded too.  Aged 14 in 1901, Henry appears to have been a boarder at a school in Harrogate and in 1911, aged 24, he is recorded as being a solicitor, living again with his parents Thomas and Ada and with more sisters and a brother.

The North Yorkshire history website records Henry as ‘Admitted Oct 1911.  Member of Faber, Fawcett & Faber, of Stockton-on-Tees.  Mobilised Aug 1914 as Capt., 5th Batt. Durham Light Infantry, promoted Major June 1916.  Once mentioned in Dispatches.  Served at Home and in Flanders and France.  Wounded May 24, 1915.’

I believe Henry married his first wife Ellen Holberton in Totnes, Devon in 1916. Their daughter Elizabeth was born in Knaresborough in 1917 and in 1939 her  occupation is shown as VAD, which I have learned stands for Voluntary Aid Detachment, a voluntary unit of civilians providing nursing care for military personnel in the United Kingdom and various other countries in the British Empire. Searching for Henry Grey Faber on the Find My past website, I found details of his service, medals and awards and his first world war record.  Ellen it seems also served in the army as a staff nurse.

Thomas Faber (Henry’s father)

Henry’s father was Thomas H Faber, born 1861, He can be found on the 1871 census at Middleton One Row, Middleton St George, Darlington, Durham, England, aged 10, with his parents Henry Grey Faber, aged 41 (born 1830 in Durham) and Elizabeth Faber, aged 38 (born 1833 in Durham). Also four brothers and two sisters – Eleanor J Faber, Elizabeth S Faber, Frank S Faber, Charles E Faber, Frederic William Faber and John G Faber. The Faber family are all recorded as visitors to Sarah Moore aged 75 and her daughter Mary A Moore aged 37.

On the 1891 census, Thomas, aged 30, is recorded as living with his wife Ada C Faber and his sons Henry G Faber and Frank S Faber. Thomas is recorded as a solicitor. On the 1901 census, Thomas and Ada can again be found.  They have five daughters named Ada, Helen, Lorna, Culeen and Olive. And in 1911 the family can be found at 100 High Street, Norton On Tees. Henry Grey Faber, aged 24, is again living with them and father and son are both recorded as solicitors.

This information is also confirmed in the documents of Hamilton Stanley Faber in which the family are referred to as ‘Branch 1 – The Stockton (Eeles) branch of the Grey Fabers.)

Henry Faber (Henry’s grandfather)

Henry’s grandfather was also called  Henry Grey Faber. He was the first son of Thomas Henry and Eleanor Faber and was baptised on 1 December 1829 in Durham.  This information is again confirmed in the documents of Hamilton Stanley Faber in which the family are referred to as ‘Branch 1 – The Stockton (Eeles) branch of the Grey Fabers and in which Eleanor is recorded as the daughter of John Grey Esq of Norton.

Henry can be found on the 1841 census, aged 11, at Shincliffe, St Oswald, Durham and Lanchester, Durham, England which appears to be a school. In 1851 aged 21 Henry can be found lodging in the household of George and Hannah Harrision at Church Street, Guisborough, Yorkshire & Yorkshire (North Riding), England and employed as a Solicitor’s Articled Clerk.  In 1871 he can be found aged 41 residing with the Moore family as described above.

The papers of Hamilton Stanley Faber advise the following about Henry.

Henry Grey Faber Esq was a solicitor and town clerk of Stockton. Eldest son of Thomas Henry Faber Esq of Stockton. Born at Stockton 30 November 1829. Baptised by the Rev: Jno: Cundell next day. Christened by the Rev: Geo: Stanley Faber at Stockton church 11 October 1830.

He was educated at Rugby and matriculated at University College Oxon 29 March 1848 at 18. He married at Holy Trinity Stockton-on-Tees 15 December 1859 Elizabeth Eeles daughter of John Eeles, Mayor of Stockton 1847/8/9 (by Elizabeth Colpitts. his wife. cousin of Colpitts Grainger Esq sometime MP for Durham) and grandfather of Jeremiah Eeles of Stockton-on-Tees.

Mr H G Faber did 5 February 1885 was was buried at the Stockton cemetery. He left issue:

1. Thomas Henry Faber of Norton

Solicitor born 18 September 1860, educated at Malvern College and married 1885 Ada Cotton daughter of Alfred Giles of Cosford, Surrey Esq. MP for Southampton and Jane Emily Coppard his wife.

Mr T H Faber had issue.

  • Henry Grey Faber born 1886.
  • Frank Stanley Faber born 1887/1888.
  • Ada Mary Faber born 1890.
  • Helen Margaret Faber born 1891.
  • Lorna Kathleen Fabert born 1894.
  • Aileen Coppard born 1895.
  • Olive Faber born 1899.

2. Frank Stanley Faber

Born 14 May 1864. Died unmarried in the USA of typhoid fever in 1890.

3. Charles Edward Faber

Egglescliffe Yam-on-Tees, solicitor partner with his brother in the firm of Faber Fawcetts and Faber of Stockton-on-Tees. Born 12 January 1855.

Origin of the names Faber and Grey

Information about the origin of the Faber and Grey surnames can be found on the Ancestry.co.uk website.

I am interested to learn more about the surnames Faber and Grey, as the name Grey appears to have been used as a middle name by many people with the surname Faber, both male and female, including Henry and Edward, largely in Stockton on Tees. However, I have also found the name connected to  Dorset, London, Middlesex and Essex and would very much like to know more about this.

Further information and sources

Faber family pedigree

In 2019 I contacted the College of Arms to see what I could learn about the Faber family. I had been told that the Faber family appeared in Burke’s peerage, my dad recalled that in the dining room at his aunt Dorothy’s home there was a full set of dining  table china with the Faber coat of arms on each item and I had also found images online relating to a sword belonging to a Henry Grey Faber which I wanted to learn more about.

The College of Arms

The College of Arms is the official heraldic authority for England, Wales, Northern Ireland and much of the Commonwealth including Australia and New Zealand. As well as being responsible for the granting of new coats of arms, the College maintains registers of arms, pedigrees, genealogies, Royal Licences, changes of name, and flags. The heralds, besides having ceremonial duties, advise on all matters relating to the peerage and baronetage, precedence, honours and ceremonial as well as national and community symbols including flags. Christopher Vane, Chester Herald at the College of Arms, explained as follows.

Arms belong to lines of descent and not surnames. Two branches of the same family may have quite different arms while others branches may not be entitled to arms at all. At all times significant numbers of people have just assumed “arms” irregularly and without lawful authority. This may be a matter of regret to the heralds but it is a fact of life. The heralds have always had difficulty controlling the irregular use of arms. Such irregular use of arms is often of historical interest. In practice where “arms” are just assumed it is not uncommon for a family to assume “arms” which are similar or even identical to the arms of another family with the same or a similar surname.

We have at the College of Arms an extensive pedigree for the Faber family which was recorded in 1902 by Hamilton S Faber, the man whom you mentioned in your email of 28th February. He was the first cousin of Henry Grey Faber’s father.

There were two branches of the Faber family with different coats of arms and crests. The arms to which Henry Grey Faber was entitled were granted in 1928. They were granted on the application of Hamilton S Faber’s widowed mother to the descendants of her late husband’s father, Thomas Henry Faber. Henry Grey Faber was the grandson of Thomas Henry Faber and thus he became entitled to the arms by descent.

The arms were thus granted sometime after the sword was manufactured. The crest could have been engraved on the sword at a later date. Alternatively it may be that the relevant branch of the Faber family had been using the arms informally prior to the grant in 1928: see paragraph 2 above.

The arms and crest so granted in 1928 can be blazoned as follows: coat of arms Or a Rose Gules barbed and seeded proper on a Chief Azure two Mullets Argent and crest Issuant out of a Coronet composed of three Roses Or a dexter Cubit Arm in armour the hand proper grasping a Rose Gules barbed seeded and slipped and encircling the wrist a Wreath of Oak also proper fructed Gold.

There was another branch of the family, which had rather different arms. This branch of the family included two peers, the first and last Lord Faber and the first and last Lord Wittenham. The pedigree recorded at the College of Arms is headed by William Faber of Leeds (d.1775). He had a son, Rev. Thomas Faber (1729-1821), Vicar of Calverley, Yorkshire, who is shown as having four sons. Henry Grey Faber was descended from the third son, Thomas Henry Faber of Bishop Auckland. This Thomas Henry Faber was the father of the Thomas Henry Faber to whom I referred earlier. Lords Faber and Wittenham were descended from Rev. Thomas Faber’s second son, Charles David Faber.

faber-branches
Family tree showing the Faber family from William Faber of Leeds.

bishop-auckland-fabers
Family tree showing Henry Grey Faber was descended from Thomas Henry Faber of Bishop Auckland.

Pedigrees for the family can be found in the 1952 and 1972 editions of Burke’s Landed Gentry, but I think that these entries will still be in copyright. Your great aunt appears in the entry in the 1972 edition.

Frederick William Faber (1814-1863), the hymn writer, was the fourth son of the elder Thomas Henry Faber.

The sword of Captain H G Faber of the 5th Battalion

While searching for information about Henry Grey Faber  I found images online showing a sword  described as ‘The sword of Captain H G Faber of the 5th Battalion, who departed for France in 1915. He was present at the Second Battle of Ypres in 1915, The Somme 1916, Arras and Passchendaele in 1917. Became a Major in 1918. Blade of 32 1/4 inches engraved with Family Crest and H.G.F., Royal Arms, Crowned ER VII, foliage and retailer – Samuel Brothers, and back edge with – London Made and numbered 1115. Plated hilt with Crowned ER VII and wire bound fishskin grip complete. Sword bag marked with H.G. Faber, Norton-On-Tees, 10th Oct 1906.’

The seller of the sword explained the reference to 1897 is the pattern of the sword, which is when this style of sword and hilt started to be used and is still used today. The images of the sword on this website, are used with the permission of Jemswords. I have also located an image on the My Family Silver website, which shows the same crest that appears on the sword. Written under the image it says ‘Hamilton S., Esquire, M.R.C.S., L.R.C.S., of St. George’s Hospital, Hyde Park Corner, London, S.W.’

Further information and sources

Photos

Hamilton S Faber

I learned about Hamilton Stanley Faber from The College of Arms when researching the Faber family. They advised me they held an extensive pedigree for the Faber family, recorded in 1902 by Hamilton S Faber, who was the first cousin of Henry Grey Faber’s father. I subsequently found that Hamilton’s work had been posted online and a link is posted below.

branch-three-garvey-grey-fabers
Family tree showing the Garvey branch of the Grey Fabers including Hamilton Stanley Faber.

The information I have learned about Hamilton Stanley Faber and his family is as follows.

1881: Hamilton Stanley Faber, aged 2, is recorded at living at 1, Esplanade, Teignmouth East, Newton Abbot, Devon, England, with his parents Edward G Faber (a wine merchant) aged 45, Edith  M Faber aged 30 and Edward G Faber, Ernest M Faber and Evelyn A Faber.  Also, a governess and two nurses.

1901: Hamilton S Faber, aged 22, is a medical student, living at 95, Fordwych Road, Hampstead, London & Middlesex, England, living with parents Edward G Faber (retired from owning ironworks), Edith M Faber and Ernest W Faber aged 24 (member of the London Stock Exchange).

1911: Hamilton Stanley Faber, aged 32, is working as Doctor Mp Mrcs Lrcp and living at 28 Chichele Road Cricklewood NW, Willesden, Middlesex, England with his mother Edith Maria  Faber (now a widow), Edward Jocy Faber and Ernest Waddington Faber. Also two servants.

1939: Hamilton S Faber is working as a medical practioner and living at 25 Chichele Road , Willesden M.B., Middlesex, England with Jean (Caslow) Faber and three others.

Edward G Faber

Hamilton’s father Edward G Faber was born in 1836 and can be found on 1841 census. A marriage of Edward Grey Faber to Edith Maria Garvey is also recorded at Christ Church With St Paul, Forest Hill, Lewisham, England on 9 April 1874. The fathers names are given as Thomas Henry Faber and John Garvey, a Clerk in Holy Orders.

The 1841 census records Edward, aged 5 (born in Durham 1836) as living at High Street, Stockton, Durham, England with parents Thomas Henry Faber aged 55 (born 1786) and Eleanor Faber aged 36 (born 1805 in Durham). Also siblings Ann, Eleanor, Frank, Edward, Elizabeth and Mary.

The Faber family

My great aunt Dorothy (my grandmother’s sister) married Henry Grey Faber in 1960. Dorothy was his second wife.  This page covers the research I have done on Dorothy and Henry Grey Faber and the extended research I have done on the Faber and Grey families.

Further information about The Faber family can also be found below.

Henry Grey Faber

Henry Grey Faber was the husband of my great aunt Dorothy (my grandmother’s sister). Dorothy was Henry’s second wife and the couple were married at  Holy Trinity Church, Micklegate, York in 1960. Although Henry is not a direct ancestor, I was interested to learn about him, as I have a very clear memory of being told by my great aunt that his family appeared in Burke’s Peerage and I wanted to learn more about this.

My dad tells me Henry was known as Hal and that he worked as a solicitor. I have confirmed this to be correct by looking at census returns and have also found mentions of Henry’s legal career in the Gazette newspaper.

The 1891 census shows a Henry  G Faber was born in Durham in 1887, to Thomas Faber, aged 30 (born 1861 in Durham) and Ada Faber  aged 29 (born 1862 in Wimbledon, Surrey). A younger brother and sister, Frank S and Ada L are recorded too.  Aged 14 in 1901, Henry appears to have been a boarder at a school in Harrogate and in 1911, aged 24, he is recorded as being a solicitor, living again with his parents Thomas and Ada and with more sisters and a brother.

I have also located information about Henry on the 1939 register, working as a solicitor and living with Ellen G Faber and Elizabeth H F Faber. I believe Henry married Ellen Holberton in Totnes, Devon in 1916. Their daughter Elizabeth was born in Knaresborough in 1917 and in 1939 her  occupation is shown as VAD, which I have learned stands for Voluntary Aid Detachment, a voluntary unit of civilians providing nursing care for military personnel in the United Kingdom and various other countries in the British Empire.

It would be another 20 years before Henry would marry Dorothy, who was working as a school teacher at the time, living in the Morrison household at Faceby Manor Faceby, Stokesley R.D., Yorkshire (North Riding), England.

Searching for Henry Grey Faber on the Find My past website, I found details of his service, medals and awards and his first world war record.  Ellen it seems also served in the army as a staff nurse.

Henry’s father Thomas, born 1861, can be found on the 1871 census residing at Middleton One Row, Middleton St George, Darlington, Durham, England, with his parents Henry Grey Faber, aged 41 (born 1830 in Durham) and Elizabeth Faber, aged 38 (born 1833 in Durham). Also four brothers and two sisters.  The Faber family are all recorded as visitors to Sarah Moore aged 75 and her daughter Mary A Moore aged 37.

I believe that Henry’s grandfather, also called  Henry Grey Faber, was the first son of Thomas Henry and Eleanor Faber and that he was baptised on 1 December 1829 in Durham.  Henry can be found on the 1841 census, aged 11, at Shincliffe, St Oswald, Durham and Lanchester, Durham, England which appears to be a school. In 1851 aged 21 Henry can be found lodging in the household of George and Hannah Harrision at Church Street, Guisborough, Yorkshire & Yorkshire (North Riding), England and employed as a Solicitor’s Articled Clerk.  In 1871 he can be found aged 41 residing with the Moore family as described above.

Origin of the names Faber and Grey

Information about the origin of the Faber and Grey surnames can be found on the Ancestry.co.uk website.

I am interested to learn more about the surnames Faber and Grey, as the name Grey appears to have been used as a middle name by many people with the surname Faber, both male and female, including Henry and Edward, largely in Stockton on Tees. However, I have also found the name connected to  Dorset, London, Middlesex and Essex and would very much like to know more about this. See footnote about the family of Hamilton S Faber and in particular his grandparents Thomas Henry Faber and Eleanor Faber (nee Grey).

More photos

Governess to the King of Iraq

Dorothy Clarke, later Faber, was the eldest child of my great grandparents Albert and Louisa and she encouraged my interest in family history, sending me photos and other bits and pieces. Although born in Northamptonshire, I only remember her living in a big house in York that she shared with her sister Molly and two sausage dogs. The house overlooked the white horse cut into the hillside on the North York Moors.

One of the most interesting things Dorothy sent to me was the letter below from a Miss Lennox-Carr of Piccadilly (according to the biography of the historical novelist Georgette Heyer, Miss Lennox-Carr ran a registry office for governesses), recommending Dorothy for the post of governess to the young King of Iraq. I don’t believe that Dorothy took up the offer but nevertheless it is a lovely piece of family history.

governess-1

governess-2
In January 2022 I was contacted by Tony Walker who had seen this blog post.  He had come across a document for Miss Carr’s agency when sorting through some some historical papers and asked if I would like a copy. The document can be viewed below.

Terms and conditions for Miss Lennox-Carr's Ladies' Employment and School Agency.